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HEATING


heating

Not feeling the heat?
We can get it back in
no time.

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AIR
CONDITIONING


AIR CONDITIONING

We have more
ways than ever to
keep you cool.

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IMPROVED
AIR QUALITY


IMPROVED AIR QUALITY

Enjoy greater comfort
with improved indoor
air quality.

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PREFERRED CUSTOMER
PLAN


PREFERRED CUSTOMER
PLAN

From preventive maintenance
to discounts on all repairs,
this plan is for you.

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How to Spot an Air Conditioner Leak

How to Spot an Air Conditioner Leak

Of all the places that water can leak from, chances are you wouldn’t expect much activity from your AC system. But it happens, just as sure as water leaks from water heaters, faucets, roofs, and other places.

AC leaks also can run into some big money to get them fixed. But, if caught early in the process, most if not all damage can be prevented. So, learn how to do a little trouble shooting and become part of the solution.

Inspect the drain pan.

The drain pan is located directly under the indoor AC unit (air handler), where it catches condensation that forms as your air conditioner runs. If the drain pan is cracked or damaged, water will leak out. Use a flashlight to thoroughly inspect the drain pan, paying special attention to the corners. In some cases, cracks can be sealed with epoxy but you’re generally better off replacing the pan.

Check the air filter.

If the pan doesn’t appear to be at fault, check the air filter. Located directly inside the air handler, the filter traps dust, dirt, and other particles, helping to maintain clean indoor air while enabling your system to operate more efficiently. But if the filter clogs up badly enough, cool air can’t pass through it. That in turn can cause the evaporator coils inside the air handler to melt and leak large amounts of water. You can help prevent all that by cleaning or replacing your filter every 6 to 8 weeks.

Check the condensate line.

Located outside and near the condenser, the condensate line is subject to the elements year-round. As such, it can clog with algae resulting in a backflow. To troubleshoot, turn the system off. Head outside and locate the condensate line, typically a ¾ inch PVC pipe in the ground. Position your wet-dry vac near the pipe and choose an attachment that is smaller than the pipe opening, just enough to form an air-tight seal. Turn the vacuum on and let it run for about four minutes. Turn the vacuum off and check the tank. If you see what appears to be algae-filled water, you’ve just solved the problem!

What’s the best solution of all for keeping your AC system in top working order all cooling season long? Contact Correct Temp for our annual preventive maintenance service – and we do mean annual. With regular professional care, your system will last longer, incur fewer repairs, and help cut your utility bills by large sums. Contact us to schedule service today.

How to Spot an Air Conditioner Leak