Friendly Reminder: Correct Temp continues to follow CDC guidelines regarding the pandemic to help keep you safe.
Facebook Google search

HEATING


heating

Not feeling the heat?
We can get it back in
no time.

LEARN MOREDetails

AIR
CONDITIONING


AIR CONDITIONING

We have more
ways than ever to
keep you cool.

LEARN MOREDetails

IMPROVED
AIR QUALITY


IMPROVED AIR QUALITY

Enjoy greater comfort
with improved indoor
air quality.

LEARN MOREDetails

PREFERRED CUSTOMER
PLAN


PREFERRED CUSTOMER
PLAN

From preventive maintenance
to discounts on all repairs,
this plan is for you.

LEARN MOREDetails

How to Prevent Hypothermia

How to Prevent Hypothermia

Hypothermia occurs when your body’s core temperature drops to 96 degrees or less. As that temperature falls, you become increasingly prone to blurred senses and hallucinations.  

As body temperature continues to drop, you’re also likely to experience an irregular heartbeat…at that point, and without medical intervention, death can occur.

On the plus side, hypothermia takes time to develop. Plus, your brain helps to fight off the effects of extreme cold with involuntary muscle contractions that produce heat. Still, when you’re starting to feel extra cold, especially at your extremities, it’s time to seek shelter or, better yet, get indoors.  

Equally important, cold temperatures alone do not cause hypothermia. Wind and wetness are also contributing factors. Knowing all that, what sort of preventive measures can you take before venturing outdoors for any length of time? Here are a few tips:

  • Dress properly for the weather: wear a hat, coat, gloves, and a face mask for extreme cold (hats help prevent heat from escaping your body).
  • Layer your clothing…outdoor clothing made of tightly woven, water-repellent material is best for your outer layer, while wool, silk or polypropylene inner layers are better than cotton at retaining body heat.
  • Keep dry, partly by avoiding over-exertion and the resulting amount of sweat it can create.
  • Limit your time outdoors in frigid temperatures.
  • Avoid alcohol consumption.

When hiking, camping, skiing or otherwise spending time outdoors in cold temperatures, always have a partner with you, and always carry a cell phone, walkie-talkie, or some other means to complete a call or otherwise signal for help.

During the winter months, you also depend on a steady and reliable supply of indoor heat. Not that you’re likely to experience hypothermia inside your own home, but without heat, you can become plenty uncomfortable just the same. To help keep your home warm and comfortable, contact Correct Temp for our heating system preventive maintenance service. It’s the best possible way to keep your furnace or boiler running better, longer, and with fewer repair issues. We look forward to your call.

How to Prevent Hypothermia